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GARDASIL®9 for Men

GARDASIL®9 is a vaccine that helps protect boys, men and individuals with a penis against 9 HPV types that can lead to certain HPV-related cancers and genital warts.

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If you’re aged 18–45, GET VACCINATED to help protect yourself.

Some facts about HPV and GARDASIL®9

HPV does not discriminate. Both men and women can contract HPV from having vaginal, anal or oral sex with someone who is infected – even from skin-to-skin sexual activity without penetration. People who have an HPV infection can spread the virus to their partner without knowing it because they may not have any visible symptoms or know they are infected.


FACT:
An estimated 75% of sexually active Canadians will have at least one HPV infection in their lifetime.


FACT:
Certain HPV types can lead to genital warts and HPV-related cancers in men.


FACT:
Condoms may not be enough to protect you against HPV – they only protect the area they cover.


FACT:
It is estimated that every 10 minutes, one Canadian develops genital warts.


FACT:
Being in a monogamous relationship does NOT protect you from HPV infections.

Signs and symptoms of HPV in men

Most men who have an HPV infection do not have any symptoms and most infections will go away without treatment. Genital warts are often the only visible sign that a person is infected. Persistent HPV infections in men can lead to cancers of the anus.

There is no screening test for
HPV in men; HPV vaccination is one of the best ways to help protect yourself.

Men should have regular health exams and can be examined by their doctor for genital warts caused by HPV and signs of HPV-related cancers.

HPV in men can lead to:

Genital warts

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Genital warts

Small, cauliflower-like growths that may itch or burn. They can be raised or flat, small or large, and grow alone or in clusters.

Anal cancer

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Anal cancer

Symptoms can include anal bleeding, difficulty passing stools, pain, lumps, itching or discharge.

How to help reduce your risk

How to help reduce your risk

HPV vaccination is one of the top ways to help protect yourself against certain HPV-related cancers and diseases.

You can also help reduce your risk of HPV infection by:

Limiting your number of sexual partners

Limiting your number of sexual partners

Using a condom correctly and consistently

Using a condom correctly and consistently

Not smoking

Not smoking

Help protect yourself against certain HPV-related cancers and diseases

Frequently asked questions

Is GARDASIL®9 approved for males?

Yes. GARDASIL®9 can be administered in boys and men ages 9 to 45, to help protect against infection caused by HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 and the following diseases caused by HPV:

  • Anal cancer caused by HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58
  • Genital warts caused by types 6 and 11
  • Abnormal and precancerous anal lesions caused by types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58

For more information about GARDASIL®9, talk to your healthcare professional.

Can a man transmit an HPV infection to his partner(s)?

Yes. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the world today and can affect any man or woman who is sexually active. Men or women who have an HPV infection can spread the virus to their partner without knowing it because they may not have any visible symptoms or know they are infected.

Using condoms may reduce your chances of getting HPV, but it is highly contagious, and condoms do not provide full protection. It only protects the area it covers. A person can get infected from having vaginal, anal or oral sex with someone who is infected – even from skin-to-skin sexual activity without penetration. That said, using a condom is a great way to reduce your risk of HPV infection, not to mention an excellent way to protect against other sexually transmitted infections.

For more information about GARDASIL®9, talk to your healthcare professional.

Can a man be screened for HPV?

There is no screening test for HPV in men. Men can be examined by their doctor for genital warts caused by HPV and signs of HPV-related cancers. Most men who have an HPV infection do not have any symptoms. Genital warts are often the only visible sign that a person is infected.

Both men and women should visit a doctor for regular health exams if they think they are at risk of contracting HPV.

Have additional questions? Check out our FAQ page.

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